NZ: Decriminalisation of sex industry positive move

Taking the Crime out of Sex Work

Thursday May 13, 2010

Decriminalisation of New Zealand’s sex industry has resulted in safer, healthier sex workers, a new book by University of Otago, Christchurch, researcher Gillian Abel shows.

Since decriminalisation seven years ago sex workers are more empowered to insist on safe sex, Abel’s book “Taking the crime out of sex work – New Zealand sex workers’ fight for decriminalisation’’ shows.

Abel is a senior lecturer at the University of Otago, Christchurch’s Public Health and General Practice department.

She edited the book with Lisa Fitzgerald (a former Otago University, Christchurch, health promotion lecturer) and Catherine Healy (with Aline Taylor).

They interviewed 772 sex workers for the book. Continue reading

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Older story- Australia: The Porn Report

Alan McKee, Katherine Albury + Catharine Lumby
Melbourne University Press 2008
A book review by Danny Yee © 2008 http://dannyreviews.com/

A study of the production and consumption of pornography in Australia, The Porn Report is based on a three year project which involved a survey of a thousand Australian consumers, detailed analysis of the fifty most popular DVD titles from the largest distributors, and interviews with producers. This is augmented with additional research and some general background, beginning with a general history of pornography, drawing on Walter Kendrick’s The Secret Museum.

The survey of pornography users was not random, but was broad enough to demonstrate that the common stereotypes are wrong: unsurprisingly, given that pornography users make up about a third of Australian adults, they are fairly Continue reading

Australia: Family group apologises to sex workers

Sex workers want a ban on material which stigmates their industry.

A group opposed to prostitution has been forced to apologise to Tasmanian sex workers for saying the industry is harmful to women.

The Family Protection Society also accused sex workers of “breaking up marriages” in a series of advertisements placed in a Tasmanian daily newspaper.

Jade Barker from the lobby group Scarlet Alliance says the society agreed to apologise after the alliance lodged a complaint.

“Scarlet Alliance commenced action under the Tasmanian Anti-discrimination Act of 1998 in relation to the Family Protection Society and a conciliation was held and an apology given which was published by the Family Protection Society,” she said.

Tasmanian sex worker “Claire” says the society has a long history of publishing material stigmatising sex workers.

“[It says] things like prostitution harms women, prositution disturbs marriages.”

She says the apology is welcome but it is only the first step.

“Ads like these should be banned from the paper.”

The Alliance is continuing to push for the decriminalisation of prostitution in Tasmania.

Attempts to contact the Family Protection Society have been unsuccessful.

See original at ABC Australia