Buying sex in German Homes for the Elderly

Catharina KönigThursday, May 19 (This appeared in a Swedish publication. In Sweden, it is a crime to purchase sex. This was translated from Swedish to English by Google Chrome)

In Germany, prostitution is permitted since 2002. Disabled people who buy sex could not expect compensation from the insurance fund, unlike in the Netherlands where prostitution is legal since 2000 and where you can get money for buying sex and using money from the insurance fund as part of the individual’s personal budget.

The union of healthcare workers, Nu91, in the Netherlands is currently running the campaign ‘Here I draw a border “since the staff complained that they asked to perform sexual acts.

In several municipalities in Denmark, staff at nursing homes help provide sex toys.
Continue reading

Spain breaks up male-prostitute trafficking gang

August 31, 2010 – 8:58am
By DANIEL WOOLLS
Associated Press Writer

MADRID (AP) – Spanish police say that for the first time they have broken up a human-trafficking gang that brought men to the country to work as prostitutes, providing them with Viagra, cocaine and other stimulant drugs to be available for sex with other men 24 hours a day.

Authorities arrested 14 people, mainly Brazilians, on suspicion of running the organization and another 17 alleged prostitutes for being in Spain illegally, the National Police said in a statement Tuesday.

Police inspector Jose Nieto said the case involving the Brazilians was the first in which Spanish authorities dismantled a ring in which traffickers brought in men, rather than women, to toil as sex workers. Continue reading

Swedish minister faces prostitution claims

Jul 10, 2010 2:23 PM | By Sapa-dpa

A sex scandal is rocking the Swedish government in the run-up to general elections, with the Aftonbladet newspaper reporting – three days after his resignation – that labour minister Sven Otto Littorin once hired a prostitute.

Paying for sex has been a crime in Sweden since 1999. Proven interactions with prostitutes are punishable with fines and, in some cases, imprisonment.

The affair is all the more explosive because Littorin, 44, did not mention the paper’s allegations while announcing his resignation on Wednesday, even though he reportedly had been informed of the charges shortly before. Continue reading

SWEDEN: Women are not children – remember? Flawed ideas about improving the sex-purchase law

From The Other Swedish Model
Gender, sex and culture, by Laura Agustín

Much of my work revolves around prostitution law, sex worker rights and the cultural study of commercial sex: see Border Thinking, where I blog several times a week. I wrote the following piece after some people in Sweden welcomed a parliamentarian’s suggestion that Sweden change to a regulatory regime that comes from the 19th century.

Does sexköpslagen, the law against buying sex, work or not? Everyone wants to know. Camilla Lindberg is right that talking about the possibility that the law does not work is taboo in Sweden. The government’s official evaluation of the law has been delayed, probably because it has not been easy to find evidence to demonstrate the reasons behind an absence. That is, you may look around and not see sex workers and their customers where you did before. But you cannot know whether they have stopped buying and selling sex or, if they have not stopped, where they have gone.

Evaluators will question police and social workers, and maybe get to speak to a few sex workers, but none of these can give an overview of sex markets that operate via private telephones and the Internet, in the privacy of homes and hotel rooms. And evaluators certainly cannot say how many people are doing what. Street prostitutes are estimated in some countries to constitute less than ten per cent of all sex workers, so, even if there are few left to see, 90% are unaccounted for. When businesses that sell sex are outlawed, they hide, so government accountants are unlikely to find them – and, after all, many are just individuals working alone.

But if we want to discuss the whole sex industry more openly, we should not focus on the concept of brothels, as Lindberg suggests – particularly not on the idea of health checks for workers. This 19th-century French idea could not be more patriarchal and thus the very opposite of jämställdhet, sexköpslagens guiding principle. Basic common sense tells us that, if disease-transmission is a concern, all parties exchanging fluids have to practice safer sex – not ‘be checked’. And although laws in the Netherlands, Germany, New Zealand, Nevada and parts of Australia allow and regulate brothels as one form of commercial sex, many people who sell sex in those countries prefer to work on their own, in small groups in flats or – yes – on the street. In France, organised sex workers vociferously oppose a proposed return to the old system of maisons closes with health controls that stigmatise prostitutes as (female) carriers of sexually-transmitted diseases…

Read the rest at The Other Swedish Model

Italy: Cassation Court: Refusing to pay a sex worker is rape

PostDateIcon Thursday, 18 March 2010 16:23 | Print

If you agree to have sex with a sex worker in Italy and for some reason you change your mind and refuse to pay for the services received, you can be charged with rape.

The Cassation Court has upheld a sentence against a sex worker’s client who refused to pay for the sexual services received.

The man will serve a four year prison sentence in addition to paying the sex worker 2000 Euros in damages.

Ms. Pia Covre, President of the Committee for the Civil Rights of Prostitutes (CDCP) expressed satisfaction at the sentence. She said that having sex with a commercial worker without paying for the services received is equivalent to sexual violence.

The Cassation Court has now made it clear that the oral contract between a sex worker and a client must be respected because it is legally binding, Ms. Covre said.

She noted that the ruling is a step towards recognition of an activity which if carried out freely, should be recognized as legal work.

Ms. Covre said that for a long time, many clients of sex workers have been refusing to pay for their services, but it was difficult in the past to convince sex workers to report their clients to the police.

She appreciated the fact that sex workers are now reporting such cases to the police in order to seek justice. This is a sign that sex workers are increasingly becoming aware of their rights and are determined to make sure that they are not violated, Ms. Covre said.

By Stephen Ogongo

See original at Africa News

German brothels raided in trafficking probe

Search of 600 establishments turns up 100 women from West Africa
Last Updated: Wednesday, February 3, 2010 | 11:30 AM ET
CBC News

German authorities say they have searched around 600 brothels across the country in an effort to track down women who may have been smuggled from West Africa as part of an international human trafficking ring.

The Federal Criminal Police Office said Wednesday that Tuesday evening’s raids turned up more than 100 women from West Africa and that there were indications that some were victims of human trafficking.

German investigators say the nationwide crackdown follows investigations that suggest a network of West Africans active in Germany and other European countries is involved in prostitution, human trafficking, passport forgery and other illegal activity. Continue reading

Thai Sex Workers: APNSW Press Release for French Press

APNSW responds to the Mitterand story:

It has come to our attention that there is still continuing debate around the issue of the French Culture Minister,
Frédéric Mitterrand, and his admission that he paid for sex with male sex workers in Thailand. We have seen attacks on him from both the left and the right of French politics- attacks which we see as both homophobic and anti-sex worker.

Worse we see the racist, orientalist views of the elites on both sides of French politics who construct Thai sex workers as somehow “backward” and unable to choose what we do. In Thailand all male sex workers are referred to by the term “Nong” which means boy. We are not duped under age boys forced into “sexual slavery.” We are people in a poor country exercising our choices to live and earn money to support ourselves, our family and our country. Continue reading

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