Buying sex in German Homes for the Elderly

Catharina KönigThursday, May 19 (This appeared in a Swedish publication. In Sweden, it is a crime to purchase sex. This was translated from Swedish to English by Google Chrome)

In Germany, prostitution is permitted since 2002. Disabled people who buy sex could not expect compensation from the insurance fund, unlike in the Netherlands where prostitution is legal since 2000 and where you can get money for buying sex and using money from the insurance fund as part of the individual’s personal budget.

The union of healthcare workers, Nu91, in the Netherlands is currently running the campaign ‘Here I draw a border “since the staff complained that they asked to perform sexual acts.

In several municipalities in Denmark, staff at nursing homes help provide sex toys.
Continue reading

SEX WORKER GROUPS RESPOND TO LONG ISLAND MURDERS

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – Friday, April 8, 2011
Contact: Dylan Wolf, SWANK, 347-748-9163, swank@riseup.net
Sarah Jenny Bleviss, SWOP-NYC, 347-841-4908, swop.nyc@gmail.com

New York – Sex Workers Action New York (SWANK) and Sex Workers Outreach Project NYC (SWOP-NYC) are dismayed that four more bodies were discovered on Long Island earlier this week. Police believe that a serial killer is responsible for murdering at least eight people found on a remote Suffolk County beach since December. Reports indicate the murder victims were in the sex trade. As sex workers and allies, SWANK and SWOP-NYC mourn the lives of these individuals and extend our sympathies to their families and communities.

“Sex workers are targeted for violence because of the stigma against what we do,” Dylan Wolf, a SWANK member said, “People think they can do whatever they want to us and they won’t get caught. And because of bad laws, social isolation and discrimination, they get away with it all the time. But like those murdered, we’re not disposable, bad people – we have lives that matter and people that love us. No matter who we are or what we do to make ends meet, we don’t deserve to die – we deserve good lives.”

A recent New York Times article suggested that dozens, if not hundreds, of people in the sex industry have been murdered in New York State since 1990. “Stories like what’s happened on Long Island make us fear for our safety,” said SWANK member Michael Bottoms, “As sex workers, we already know that stigma puts us at risk for being targeted, and so we take as many precautions as we can. But if we do experience violence, most of us can’t go to the cops, because we could get arrested, they might not take us seriously, or they could have been the ones who were violent to us in the first place.”

“When we ignore violence against sex workers, we support a culture where a serial killer can murder eight, twelve, or even dozens of sex workers without the media, the police or the general public being outraged or even thinking twice,” said Maryse Mitchell-Brody, a SWOP-NYC organizer, “We won’t end this violence by keeping the sex trade illegal, because it isn’t going anywhere – this just drives people further underground and makes them more vulnerable to violence. Murders like these show that we must use new strategies to create safety and dignity that don’t reinforce stigma or discrimination.”

To learn more about what you can do to support the rights of current and former sex workers and those with experience in the sex trade to safety and well-being, visit http://www.swop-nyc.org.

Cambodia sets age limit for foreign husbands

Cambodia sets age limit for foreign husbands

PHNOM PENH, March 16, 2011 (AFP) – Male foreigners over the age of 50 have been outlawed from marrying Cambodian women in the country under new rules designed to crack down on sham marriages and human trafficking, the government said Wednesday.

Foreigners who earn less than $2,550 per month are also barred from wedding local women, foreign ministry spokesman Koy Kuong told AFP, but the restrictions do not apply to weddings taking place overseas.

Marriages between old men and young women are “inappropriate”, Koy Kuong said, and foreign men who wish to marry nationals must earn a high salary to ensure that “Cambodian women can live a decent life”.

“We are preventing fake marriages and human trafficking,” he said, adding that the government was aware of cases, documented by rights groups, where Cambodian women were sent into prostitution or “used as slaves” in their husband’s home country.

The Cambodian foreign ministry has sent a diplomatic note to all the embassies and consulates in the country informing them of the new regulations, which came into effect on March 1.

Kek Galabru, president of local human rights group Licadho, praised the government’s intention to protect Cambodian brides.

But she said the new guidelines “go against Cambodian marriage law and international law” — specifically the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women.

“This is discrimination against women because they will not be allowed to marry men who are over 50… while Cambodian men can marry any foreign woman they choose,” she said.

Cambodia imposed a temporary ban on foreign marriages in 2008 to prevent human trafficking, amid concern over a sharp rise in the number of brokered unions involving South Korean men and poor Cambodian women.

That ban followed an International Organisation for Migration report that said many Cambodian brides suffered abuse after moving to South Korea in marriages hastily arranged by brokers who made large profits.

The restriction was lifted about eight months later after new laws were introduced to prevent women becoming mail-order brides.

http://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/451792-male-foreigners-over-50-outlawed-from-marrying-cambodian-women/

India: Sex workers rue discrimination against their children

New Delhi, March 5, DHNS:

Sex workers in the country who are forced to live with ostracism have demanded a key legislative change to allow their children pursue higher studies using their mothers’ income.

According to the Immoral Traffic (Prevention) Act (ITPA), 1960, if anybody above 18 years uses the earnings of a sex-worker, he or she can be prosecuted. If the children of sex workers use their mothers’ income, long hand of law can catch them.

“How many children start earning at 18? Why this bias against us when we strive to study and make a living against all social hurdles,” rues Parvati, daughter of a Kolkata-based commercial sex worker. Continue reading

Canada: Abuse standard treatment: sex workers

Concern Over Police Conduct; Advocacy group to ask rights commission to
conduct inquiry into claims against police

By Don Butler, Ottawa Citizen
December 1, 2010

Ottawa police are facing new allegations of misconduct, this time toward the city’s sex workers.

A report to be released today by Prostitutes of Ottawa-Gatineau Work, Educate and Resist (POWER) claims that city police officers regularly assault, abuse and harass prostitutes and other sex workers.

A few of the sex workers interviewed said they’d even been strip-searched by officers in public areas.

The findings have prompted POWER, a sex-worker-led advocacy organization, to ask the Ontario Human Rights Commission to conduct a public inquiry into the Ottawa police’s “systemic discrimination” against sex workers.

In an 11-page letter to the rights commission, POWER says the Ottawa 7Police Service discriminates against sex workers on three prohibited grounds — sex, ethnicity and “perceived disability.” Continue reading

NSWP Supports Sex Workers in Uganda and Their Right to Organise

Nov 22nd, 2010 | By Communications | Category: Policy and Activism

Last week, the Sex Workers Leadership Institute organized by Akina Mama Wa Afrika and set to take place in Kampala, Uganda from 18 to 20th November was shut down by Uganda’s Minister of Ethics and Integrity, Nsaba Buturo. In a letter to the hotel hosting the conference, Buturo states that “prostitution is a criminal offence in Uganda” and as a result “the hotel is an accomplice in an illegality.”

Sex workers throughout Africa are vulnerable to violence from the police who criminalise and harass us, health institutions that refuse to treat us, and civil society members who deny us our humanity. By preventing sex workers from organising, the Ugandan government is complicit is perpetuating these grave injustices. Criminalising income generating activities that people engage in to survive, such as sex work, is not an effective way to reduce crime or protect safety.

The Global Network of Sex Work Projects (NSWP) stands in solidarity with sex workers in Africa who are reaching out to one another and building a grassroots network that stands up for sex workers’ rights. Uganda’s continued criminalisation and stigmatisation of sex workers is a violation of human rights, and we strongly oppose the harm it does to our communities.

You can download this statement as an one-page PDF (English only) here.

See original at IAC-NSWP

Uganda: Government should reverse decision to ban workshop (Amnesty International)

AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
PUBLIC STATEMENT
AI Index: AFR 59/014/2010
19 November 2010

Uganda: Government should reverse decision to ban workshop intended to discuss human rights issues affecting sex workers

Amnesty International today condemns the decision by the Ugandan government’s Ethics and
Integrity Minister to ban a three-day civil society workshop that had been intended to discuss
human rights issues of concern to sex workers in Uganda and other East African countries. The
organization calls on the Ugandan government to reverse the Minister’s decision stopping this
workshop. The government must also unequivocally state its commitment to supporting human
rights work. Continue reading

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