Legal prostitution would be safer

By Daniel Akst
Thursday, April 14, 2011 – Updated 2 days ago

Remember Chandra Levy? How about Natalee Holloway? Nothing is more effective at triggering a media frenzy than the disappearance of an attractive young white woman. That’s what happened when Levy, a Washington intern, vanished in 2001 and Holloway disappeared in Aruba four years later. Sadly, things are different when the woman has accepted money for sex.

Police have so far found the bodies of four young white women, all prostitutes, in scrubby dunes on the beaches of New York’s Long Island (five and possibly six more sets of remains are unidentified). The women had been missing for months or even years.

It’s hard to see what change in law might save someone from being in the wrong place at the wrong time. But some of the Gilgo Beach deaths might well have been averted if Continue reading

Canada: VANISHING POINT: The highway murders

VANCOUVER SUN
Saturday, December 12, 2009
Lori Culbert and Neal Hall

The official list of missing o[f] murdered young women on B.C. and Alberta highways contains 18 names. But many more victims may have left anguished families behind.

In their hunt to determine whether a serial killer is preying on girls and women along B.C. roadways, investigators have identified 2,000 “persons of interest” in the so-called Highway of Tears investigation.

Project E-Pana, the joint RCMP-Vancouver police unit probing missing and murdered women along B.C. highways, previously has been tightlipped about the high-profile investigation. Continue reading

Memorial for Catherine Lique

[blip.tv ?posts_id=3003701&dest=-1]

Missing woman’s remains positively identified in Death Valley

November 06, 2009 3:37 PM
By JESSICA CEJNAR, staff writer

Human remains that were found in Death Valley National Park about a year and a half ago were positively identified recently as belonging to a woman who was last seen in Barstow in 2003.

The Inyo County Coroner’s office positively determined that the remains belonged to Catherine Lique 10 days ago, said Jeff Mullenhour, deputy coroner for the southern region of Inyo County. Lique’s next of kin, daughter Stephanie Thompson, was notified three days ago, he said. At this time the cause of Lique’s death is still being investigated.

Lique was 44 when she disappeared. Continue reading

Jessie Foster- Do you know her???

JESSIE
DO YOU
KNOW HER???

Jessie Foster 2005

Jessie Foster 2005

Call: Detective Dave Molnar of the North Las Vegas, NV USA police department at 702-633-1779
or: Constable Darin Rapell of the RCMP, Kamloops, BC Canada office at 250-828-3293
or: your own local 911, Police or Crime Stoppers with info to help us find Jessie,
she has been missing since she was 21 years old, over 3 ½ years, since March 29, 2006.
www.jessiefoster.ca

Catherine Lique

Catherine Lique was last seen in Barstow, California on November 26, 2003. She has never been heard from again. She was involved with prostitution at the time of her disappearance, and frequented local truck stops. Her boyfriend stated she simply left one morning and never returned; he said he believed she had run off with another man, possibly a truck driver. Lique’s children reported her missing about a month after she was last seen.

Catherine’s family doesn’t believe she left of her own accord, as it’s uncharacteristic of her to be out of touch with them. Her own mother died after her disappearance, as did her ex-husband. and her family thinks Lique would have contacted them if she could have. Her case remains unsolved.

If you have any information concerning this case, please contact:
Barstow Police Dept: 760-256-2211

Source: The Charley Project

Residents on edge as 9 women vanish from N.C. city

Search for serial killer after six turn up dead AP .

By ALYSIA PATTERSON, Associated Press Writer Alysia Patterson, Associated Press Writer – 2 hrs 36 mins ago

ROCKY MOUNT, N.C. – They spent their nights jumping in and out of strange cars, trolling otherwise empty streets lined with decaying storefronts and boarded-up homes. Many sold sex to support drug habits or children left in the care of worried, hardworking grandmothers.

Even when they were picked up for drugs or prostitution, nights in jail looming, they called home to let their families know they were OK. Then, one by one, the calls stopped. Continue reading