Boynton Beach escort dies, former FAU cop charged with murder

By MICHAEL LAFORGIA
Palm Beach Post Staff Writer
Updated: 5:22 p.m. Friday, Feb. 4, 2011
Posted: 1:50 p.m. Friday, Feb. 4, 2011

A woman who city detectives say was shot and wounded by an off-duty Florida Atlantic University police officer died this morning of her injuries, and investigators this afternoon added a first-degree murder charge to the allegations against him, police said.

Jimmy Dac Ho, 47, of Boynton Beach was arrested Tuesday in the shooting of Sheri Carter, 29, an escort who advertised her services on a website that has factored in numerous prostitution and human trafficking investigations.
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Senior police officer calls for review of law on prostitution

Press Release

Senior police officer calls for review of law on prostitution
The International Union of Sex Workers
Tuesday 28th December 2010 Immediate Release

Contact: Catherine Stephens on 07772 638748 or Amy on 07510 575903

The IUSW welcomes the statements by ACPO’s lead on prostitution and sexual exploitation, Assistant Chief Constable Simon Byrne, that it is time to look again at the laws around prostitution.

Law surrounding the sex industry are complex, confusing and ineffective in targeting harm. In fact, it makes sex workers’ lives more dangerous. There are already general laws to target violence, coercion and abuse, which sex workers are prevented from accessing through fear of the police, as there is an inherent contradiction between the police roles of protection and prosecution.

3,000-22,000 of the estimated 80,000 people who sell sex in the UK do so on street and are criminalised under the Street Offences Act of 1959 if they loiter or solicit; the Sexual Offences Act 1985 penalises kerb-crawling. The Policing & Crime Act 2009 tweaked existing legislation: the requirement for persistent behaviour by kerb-crawlers was removed and a definition of “persistence” for soliciting or loitering was given: twice in three months. That gives this profoundly vulnerable group of women the opportunity to have contact with the police four times a year without fear of arrest.

Over the past 50 years, this legislation has entirely failed to solve the problems associated with street prostitution. The most “successful” outcomes, resulting from expensive long term enforcement, are displacement (for example, street sex workers moved to Norwich as a result of increased police action in Ipswich).

Indoors, it is possible to work entirely legally, but the only way to be free of the risk of prosecution is to work for yourself in complete isolation. Two people working together fulfils the legal definition of a brothel, so the law builds in isolation at the most fundamental level; the owner or tenant is liable to up to 7 years imprisonment.

“Controlling for gain” – legislation on “pimping” – explicitly includes people who are working of their own free will and covers almost every way of working with or for a third party.

Prosecution requires no evidence of coercion, violence or abuse; there have been several recent successful prosecutions where it was accepted in court that the defendant offered a safe, fair and honest working environment to women who freely chose to be there.

Likewise, our legal definition of trafficking fails to meet the standard of either the UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking (commonly called the Palermo Protocol) or the Council of Europe Convention on Trafficking. It refers to knowledge and intent, not coercion, deception or abuse.

Catherine Stephens, activist with the International Union of Sex Workers says, “The law doesn’t just fail to target violence and exploitation, it actually facilitates it. Would we be safer working together? Yes. Is that legal? No.”

A community’s worth is measured by the way it treats the most vulnerable. It is time to treat people who sell sex with respect and to prioritise our rights and safety. It is time to decriminalise sex work so people who sell sex have the full protection of the law.

——-

Canada: Abuse standard treatment: sex workers

Concern Over Police Conduct; Advocacy group to ask rights commission to
conduct inquiry into claims against police

By Don Butler, Ottawa Citizen
December 1, 2010

Ottawa police are facing new allegations of misconduct, this time toward the city’s sex workers.

A report to be released today by Prostitutes of Ottawa-Gatineau Work, Educate and Resist (POWER) claims that city police officers regularly assault, abuse and harass prostitutes and other sex workers.

A few of the sex workers interviewed said they’d even been strip-searched by officers in public areas.

The findings have prompted POWER, a sex-worker-led advocacy organization, to ask the Ontario Human Rights Commission to conduct a public inquiry into the Ottawa police’s “systemic discrimination” against sex workers.

In an 11-page letter to the rights commission, POWER says the Ottawa 7Police Service discriminates against sex workers on three prohibited grounds — sex, ethnicity and “perceived disability.” Continue reading

Craigslist clash over adult ads raises key issues

James Temple, Chronicle Staff Writer

Sunday, August 29, 2010
CEO Jim Buckmaster, above, faces criticism from politicia… CEO Jim Buckmaster faces criticism from politicians such …

Attorneys general in 18 states demanded that Craigslist remove its adult services section last week, the latest clash in a long-running conflict over online sexual ads that is likely to lead to a court battle, congressional debate or both, legal experts say.

“Eventually we’re going to see something,” said Jason Schultz, assistant professor at the UC Berkeley School of Law. “There has been political pressure building to try to pass new laws or to sue Craigslist criminally.” Continue reading

Cambodia: Sex Workers Face Unlawful Arrests and Detention

Officials Should Investigate and Close Government Centers Where Abuses Occur
July 20, 2010

(Phnom Penh) – The Cambodian government should act quickly to end violence against sex workers and permanently close the government centers where these workers have been unlawfully detained and abused, Human Rights Watch said in a new report released today. Human Rights Watch also urged the Cambodian government to suspend provisions in the 2008 Law on Suppression of Human Trafficking and Sexual Exploitation that facilitate police harassment and abuses.

Human Rights Watch’s 76-page report, “Off the Streets: Arbitrary Detention and Other Abuses against Sex Workers in Cambodia,” is based on more than 90 interviews and group discussions with female and transgender sex workers in Phnom Penh, Battambang, Banteay Meanchey, and Siem Reap. It describes how sex workers face a wide range of abuses, Continue reading

False arrests happen to us, too

Please read and forward widely!

The full statement is published here. Please read, link, tweet, circulate:
http://www.harlots-parlour.com/2010/07/false-arrests-happen-to-us-too.html

Summary:

Sometimes prostitution laws are used against people who are not engaged in prostitution. This has been happening in gay porn shops around New York, and we applaud the lawsuit regarding these false arrests. However, we hope the victims appreciate how unjust these laws are when prostitutes are arrested.

False arrests happen to sex workers every day. You may have a prostitution record and still be caught in a sweep when you’re not actively soliciting. You may be falsely charged when your workplace is raided.

IF YOU HAVE BEEN falsely arrested in New York, contact the Sex Workers Project at the Urban Justice Center for legal assistance and advice:
http://www.sexworkersproject.org

+1-646-602-5617

The Sex Workers Project offers legal help to people who may be profiled as sex workers, no matter their situation. SWP welcomes *anyone* who is arrested under these laws. You can also send an email to PONY[AT]panix.com with “SWP” in the subject line and we will refer you.

Stop the arrests! Repeal the prostitution laws!

PONY[AT]panix.com

AU: Attorney General challenges anti-prostitution lobby

Thursday, 17 June 2010
Prostitution will always be around and it is impossible to police a blanket ban, Attorney General tells community forum

By Anthony Barich

WA Attorney General Christian Porter has turned the debate on legalising brothels on its head, challenging anti-prostitution advocates to come up with a better solution than his planned legislation to restrict brothels to “entertainment zones”.

While conceding prostitution is “morally objectionable”, a blanket law criminalising it is unenforceable and legislation that permits it in specific zones is the only feasible solution, Mr Porter told a community forum in Belmont on 8 June.

“I do believe that you have to have some kind of level of prostitution which is permitted, strictly regulated for the health and safety of the people in it, because of the fact that it has always existed and because of the fact that we have not been successful over successive decades in stopping it, notwithstanding a law which says it shouldn’t exist anywhere,” Mr Porter told a forum of over 100 at Belmont’s RSL Club. Continue reading

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