Police Bust Restaurant in Suphanburi Forcing 30 Laotian Girls into Sex Service

UPDATE : 9 February 2011
The Human Trafficking Suppression Police have cracked down on a brothel in central Suphanburi province, rescuing more than 30 Laotian girls.

Human trafficking police said they have arrested 48-year Surapha Pudpa, the owner of a restaurant called ‘Phraew’, along with two staff members, for their involvement in sex trade.

Police said a man notified officers after he recently visited the restaurant, where a man at the restaurant asked if he wanted to sleep with a Laotian girl.

Original article:
http://www.thailandoutlook.tv/tan/ViewData.aspx?DataID=1040574

After saying yes, the man, who refused to give his real name, was invited to the back of the restaurant where he found at least 30 Laotian girls waiting to be chosen.

The man said he deeply sympathized with an 18-year Laotian victim who claimed she was deceived and brought into the sex business.

Police added that the restaurant acquired the women through an agency that paid 5,000 baht to the parents of the victims, claiming the girls would be working at a good restaurant.

The initial investigation found that the Laotian girls have been forced to sell sex services without receiving payment, and were threatened to be chained and beaten up.

The girls were reportedly allow just one meal a day.

Police concluded by promising that all of the victims will undergo mental health rehabilitation and receive further care, in line with an international treaty, as soon as possible.

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The numbers of sex trafficking victims are exaggerated

Figures relating to sex work and trafficking have been fudged by mainstream media, conservative feminists and career politicians. The numbers of people who are victims of sex slavery and trafficking are far lower than what is generally reported, writes Elena Jeffreys.

A startling report by investigative journalist Nick Davies for The Guardian last October, Inquiry fails to find single trafficker who forced anybody into prostitution, has shocked English policy makers and created a new war of words over migration, sex work and exploitation. Numerous opinion pieces, first hand accounts and rampant moralising followed The Guardian’s coverage of the issue between October and November last year, but Davies’ articles remains an important contribution to understanding the figure-fudging in relation to sex work and trafficking.

Davies writes that politicians and the media have been exaggerating the numbers of sex workers who are victims of sex slavery and trafficking. He goes on to compare the exaggerated numbers of trafficked sex workers with other government lies including weapons of mass destruction, and the sexed up policy dossiers that rationalised UK’s hawkish actions in relation to Iraq. Continue reading

The Crusade Against Sex Trafficking

By Noy Thrupkaew

This article appeared in the October 5, 2009 edition of The Nation.
September 16, 2009

This article is the first part of a two-part series. The next installment will explore alternative approaches to addressing the problem of trafficking for the purposes of forced prostitution.
–The Editors

Gary Haugen is cradling the padlocks in his thick hands. A former high school football player–bristly crew cut, broad shoulders squeezed into a dress shirt–Haugen has more the mien of a military man than a lawyer, although his image is in keeping with the muscular work of the organization he founded and heads. The president of the International Justice Mission, an evangelical Christian organization devoted to combating human rights abuses in the developing world, Haugen is musing over the mementos of IJM’s work in India and Cambodia. The padlocks look ordinary enough: heavy brass, a squat square one, a round one with a key. But they had once hung on the doors of brothels, until local law enforcement busted the establishments in raids initiated by IJM. Continue reading

Sex Trafficking: The Abolitionist Fallacy

Economic hardship, discrimination, and violence have driven millions of women to work in the sex sector around the world, and their numbers will increase as a result of the current global economic crisis. Unless the underlying factors pushing women to opt for selling sex to support themselves and their families are remedied, many women will continue to have few other options.

Yet the Bush administration, supported by the evangelical right-wing and some radical feminists, spent eight years promoting laws to criminalize prostitution and clients as the means to abolish prostitution and stop human trafficking into the sex sector. The ideology-driven approach is notable for the absence of any concrete evidence that it works. Proponents of such an approach have also failed to demonstrate that it avoids harming women or provides other livelihoods for those it aspires to help. It reduces all adults in the sex sector (even highly paid “call girls” and those working legally) to victim status and considers all prostitution to be a form of trafficking. Continue reading

Who says sex workers want to be ‘saved’?

New legislation aimed at scaring away potential punters will only rob those who work within the sex industry of their livelihood

Nathalie Rothschild
guardian.co.uk, Friday 13 March 2009 13.00 GMT

In these times of economic implosion, it seems there is one industry that the government is actually keen on crushing. The home secretary, Jacqui Smith, recently unveiled a proposal for new legislation aimed at bringing the sex industry to its knees (metaphorically speaking). If we tackle the demand, Smith proclaimed, then supply will diminish. In other words, Smith wants to penalise punters.

Under the proposal, anyone who buys sex or other erotic services from someone who is “controlled for another person’s gain” could be fined and receive a criminal record. Ignorance of the circumstances would be no defence. Harriet Harman, the minister for women, believes the proposed legislation will help stamp out sex trafficking, which she has described as a “modern-day slave trade”. Continue reading

UK: Is the number of trafficked call girls a myth?

Plans are afoot to give greater protection to trafficked prostitutes working in the UK. But how big is the current problem? It’s hard to know, although that hasn’t stopped some people from thinking they do, writes Ruth Alexander, of Radio 4’s More or Less.

Concern about trafficked sex workers has grown as borders between countries have become more porous. Now the government is planning to crack down on the problem by criminalising anyone caught paying for sex with a prostitute who has been trafficked or is marketed by a pimp.

But how many prostitutes are there in the UK who are “controlled for another person’s gain”? Continue reading

Cambodia: Sex Workers address MTV Exit Campaign

http://blip.tv/file/1582238

A response by sex workers in Cambodia to the MTV Exit Campaign against trafficking and exploitation.

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