Feeling good about feeling bad… A Global Review of Evaluation in Anti-Trafficking Initiatives

This research explores and assesses the evaluation of anti-trafficking policies and programmes worldwide, including three international, two regional and nine national anti-trafficking initiatives. It highlights common themes and emerging patterns between a range of approaches to evaluation in this sector and finds overwhelmingly that anti-trafficking initiatives are not being sufficiently evaluated, impeding the effectiveness of anti-trafficking responses and limiting progress in combating trafficking. Urgent action in the form of adequate evaluation systems is imperative to ensure anti-trafficking programmes are effectively targeted and delivered.

Download PDF: http://www.gaatw.org/publications/GAATW_Global_Review.FeelingGood.AboutFeelingBad.pdf

Foreword:

To a large extent, anti-trafficking efforts operate without a sufficient evidence-base. Ten years after the unveiling of the United Nation Human Trafficking Protocol there is still a dearth of reliable information on the scope and nature of this highly globalized crime and horrendous violation of human rights. Information on its dynamics, on its interrelations with other Continue reading

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Cambodia sets age limit for foreign husbands

Cambodia sets age limit for foreign husbands

PHNOM PENH, March 16, 2011 (AFP) – Male foreigners over the age of 50 have been outlawed from marrying Cambodian women in the country under new rules designed to crack down on sham marriages and human trafficking, the government said Wednesday.

Foreigners who earn less than $2,550 per month are also barred from wedding local women, foreign ministry spokesman Koy Kuong told AFP, but the restrictions do not apply to weddings taking place overseas.

Marriages between old men and young women are “inappropriate”, Koy Kuong said, and foreign men who wish to marry nationals must earn a high salary to ensure that “Cambodian women can live a decent life”.

“We are preventing fake marriages and human trafficking,” he said, adding that the government was aware of cases, documented by rights groups, where Cambodian women were sent into prostitution or “used as slaves” in their husband’s home country.

The Cambodian foreign ministry has sent a diplomatic note to all the embassies and consulates in the country informing them of the new regulations, which came into effect on March 1.

Kek Galabru, president of local human rights group Licadho, praised the government’s intention to protect Cambodian brides.

But she said the new guidelines “go against Cambodian marriage law and international law” — specifically the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women.

“This is discrimination against women because they will not be allowed to marry men who are over 50… while Cambodian men can marry any foreign woman they choose,” she said.

Cambodia imposed a temporary ban on foreign marriages in 2008 to prevent human trafficking, amid concern over a sharp rise in the number of brokered unions involving South Korean men and poor Cambodian women.

That ban followed an International Organisation for Migration report that said many Cambodian brides suffered abuse after moving to South Korea in marriages hastily arranged by brokers who made large profits.

The restriction was lifted about eight months later after new laws were introduced to prevent women becoming mail-order brides.

http://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/451792-male-foreigners-over-50-outlawed-from-marrying-cambodian-women/

Police Bust Restaurant in Suphanburi Forcing 30 Laotian Girls into Sex Service

UPDATE : 9 February 2011
The Human Trafficking Suppression Police have cracked down on a brothel in central Suphanburi province, rescuing more than 30 Laotian girls.

Human trafficking police said they have arrested 48-year Surapha Pudpa, the owner of a restaurant called ‘Phraew’, along with two staff members, for their involvement in sex trade.

Police said a man notified officers after he recently visited the restaurant, where a man at the restaurant asked if he wanted to sleep with a Laotian girl.

Original article:
http://www.thailandoutlook.tv/tan/ViewData.aspx?DataID=1040574

After saying yes, the man, who refused to give his real name, was invited to the back of the restaurant where he found at least 30 Laotian girls waiting to be chosen.

The man said he deeply sympathized with an 18-year Laotian victim who claimed she was deceived and brought into the sex business.

Police added that the restaurant acquired the women through an agency that paid 5,000 baht to the parents of the victims, claiming the girls would be working at a good restaurant.

The initial investigation found that the Laotian girls have been forced to sell sex services without receiving payment, and were threatened to be chained and beaten up.

The girls were reportedly allow just one meal a day.

Police concluded by promising that all of the victims will undergo mental health rehabilitation and receive further care, in line with an international treaty, as soon as possible.

A Lack of Transparency (re Apne Aap Women Worldwide)

By NIHARIKA S. JAIN and TARA SURI
Published: Tuesday, November 02, 2010

In a New Delhi village where a staggering 85 percent of women are victims of sex trafficking, the Najafgarh Community Centre is imprinted with the sign of Venus, the symbol for the female gender and for the anti-trafficking organization “Apne Aap Women Worldwide.” On its website, Apne Aap says it runs the Najafgarh Community Centre for the empowerment of women and children, a claim that it makes to donors worldwide. Unfortunately, the striking symbol and the large letters etched below it spelling out “Apne Aap” seem to be the organization’s only mark on the village.

We learned all this when we arrived in Najafgarh this summer with a bold idea to help the villagers transform their situation. After reading about Apne Aap and corresponding with its founder, Ruchira Gupta, we raised $20,000 to fund a vocational training program that would teach the women to sew and provide a sustainable job option as an alternative to prostitution. After an initial $12,000 donation, we received monthly reports from Apne Aap listing names of women and children involved in programs at the Community Centre. Yet we also received desperate e-mails from the community coordinator complaining that Apne Aap was not allocating money appropriately. But in light of the international accolades the organization had been receiving for its efforts to help female sex workers, we were loath to think our $12,000 contribution had been misused, Continue reading

Note to anti-prostitutionists: Sex worker movements are nothing to sneer at

[Article by Laura Agustin in response to a book written by Swedish anti-prostitution propagandist Kajsa Ekis Ekmans]

Ordinarily I avoid ideological debates, but this time I had to chime in, because the author of a nutty Swedish book actually lied about me in it. I don’t mean she distorted my ideas – that is conventional amongst feminists who feel they are engaged in a battle to the death about prostitution. No, this was a lie about me and my life: she described me as an employee of the Network for Sex Work Projects, and the company publishing her book didn’t get anyone to check her facts – even about living people, which is reprehensible. Since I am independent with a highly precarious income, and because my opinions are only my own, I could not allow the lie to go uncontested.

The book’s an attack on two activities: commercial sex and surrogate motherhood. The drivel about me is a very small part of the book, which also provides an egregiously selective and ideologically driven version of the history of sex worker rights movements. I decided to use the publishing opportunity to provide a more honest, if still very brief, version, complete with links to the evidence – probably the first such thing published in Sweden. The original book title can’t be translated exactly but means something like Being and Being a Product – the idea of commodification. Continue reading

Spain breaks up male-prostitute trafficking gang

August 31, 2010 – 8:58am
By DANIEL WOOLLS
Associated Press Writer

MADRID (AP) – Spanish police say that for the first time they have broken up a human-trafficking gang that brought men to the country to work as prostitutes, providing them with Viagra, cocaine and other stimulant drugs to be available for sex with other men 24 hours a day.

Authorities arrested 14 people, mainly Brazilians, on suspicion of running the organization and another 17 alleged prostitutes for being in Spain illegally, the National Police said in a statement Tuesday.

Police inspector Jose Nieto said the case involving the Brazilians was the first in which Spanish authorities dismantled a ring in which traffickers brought in men, rather than women, to toil as sex workers. Continue reading

Craigslist clash over adult ads raises key issues

James Temple, Chronicle Staff Writer

Sunday, August 29, 2010
CEO Jim Buckmaster, above, faces criticism from politicia… CEO Jim Buckmaster faces criticism from politicians such …

Attorneys general in 18 states demanded that Craigslist remove its adult services section last week, the latest clash in a long-running conflict over online sexual ads that is likely to lead to a court battle, congressional debate or both, legal experts say.

“Eventually we’re going to see something,” said Jason Schultz, assistant professor at the UC Berkeley School of Law. “There has been political pressure building to try to pass new laws or to sue Craigslist criminally.” Continue reading

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